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Archive for the ‘Free Energy’ Category

Geothermal power is power extracted from heat stored in the earth. This geothermal energy originates from the original formation of the planet, from radioactive decay of minerals, and from solar energy absorbed at the surface. It has been used for space heating and bathing since ancient roman times, but is now better known for generating electricity. About 10 GW of geothermal electric capacity is installed around the world as of 2007, generating 0.3% of global electricity demand. An additional 28 GW of direct geothermal heating capacity is installed for district heating, space heating, spas, industrial processes, desalination and agricultural applications.

Geothermal power is cost effective, reliable, and environmentally friendly, but has previously been geographically limited to areas near tectonic plate boundaries. Recent technological advances have dramatically expanded the range and size of viable resources, especially for direct applications such as home heating. Geothermal wells tend to release greenhouse gases trapped deep within the earth, but these emissions are much lower than those of conventional fossil fuels. As a result, geothermal power has the potential to help mitigate global warming if widely deployed instead of fossil fuels.

There are a 3 main issues with geothermal that need to be addressed before we decide that this is the best option.

  1. What impact do the gases released from geothermal implementations have on greenhouses gas emissions?
  2. How much geothermal energy does the Earth possess (and how much can we take before having an impact)?
  3. How the heck do we drill efficiently and deep enough to extract this energy.  Currently we use diamond tipped drill bits to bore holes into the Earth’s crust but this method had proven costly, time consuming and ineffective.

Issue #1 and #2 still remain controversial however a new invention from Jared Potter has addressed issue #3.  Check out the video of this prototype in work.  It is very impressive.

Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geothermal_power
http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2009-06/jets-7200°f-hydrogen-cut-through-granite-100-feet-hour
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qmxxsf_AJ3w&eurl=http://www.popsci.com/&feature=player_embedded

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